Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Effects of Exercise Programs on Functional Capacity and Quality of Life in People With Acquired Brain Injury: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

Physical Therapy 2022 November 8
OBJECTIVE: The aims of this systematic review and meta-analyses were to evaluate the effects of exercise on the functional capacity and quality of life (QoL) of people with acquired brain injury (ABI) and to analyze the influence of training variables.

METHODS: Five electronic databases (MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, SportDiscus, and Web of Science) were searched until October 2021 for clinical trials or experimental studies examining the effects of exercise on the functional capacity and QoL in adults with ABI and comparing exercise interventions to nonexercise (usual care).

RESULTS: Thirty eight studies were evaluated. A total sample of 2219 people with ABI (exercise, n = 1572; control, n = 647) were included in the quantitative analysis. A greater improvement was observed in walking endurance (z score = 2.84), gait speed (z score = 2.01), and QoL physical subscale (z score = 3.42) and QoL mental subscale (z score = 3.00) was observed in the experimental group than in the control group. In addition, an improvement was also observed in the experimental group in the "Timed "Up and Go" Test scores and balance, without differences with respect to the control group. Significant interactions were also observed between the rehabilitation phases, type, frequency, and volume of training, and overall effects.

CONCLUSION: The results suggest that exercise improves functional capacity and QoL regardless of model training, highlighting the effectiveness of long-term exercise that includes short sessions, with components such as strength, balance, and aerobic exercise.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app