Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
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Systematic Review
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Is cysteamine use effective in the treatment of melasma? A systematic review and meta-analysis.

Dermatologic Therapy 2022 December
Melasma is a recurrent hypermelanosis disorder characterized by the appearance of brownish and symmetrical spots on the skin. It affects the quality of life and is resistant to available treatment approaches. Cysteamine has been reported as a promising depigmenting agent for melasma treatment and following formulation enhancement, its use is being reported. This review aimed to evaluate the efficacy of the use of depigmenting formulations containing 5% cysteamine in the treatment of patients with melasma. A systematic search was performed in PubMed, Science Direct, and Scielo databases until December 27, 2021, based on criteria selected by the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. Statistical analysis was performed with Review Manager 5.4 software. The risk of bias was assessed using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool for Randomized Trials. A total of six studies containing 120 melasma patients treated with 5% cysteamine were included in this meta-analysis. The meta-analysis demonstrated that 5% cysteamine is effective for the treatment of patients with melasma (MD 6.26 [95% CI 3.68-8.83], p < 0.0001, I2  = 86%). In this review, through meta-analysis allows concluding that 5% cysteamine is effective in the treatment of melasma and presents a low probability of side or adverse effects.

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