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Omalizumab as a corticosteroid-sparing agent in the treatment of bullous pemphigoid.

Dermatologic Therapy 2022 December
Bullous pemphigoid (BP) is the most common autoimmune blistering skin disease, characterized by the development of autoantibodies against hemidesmosomal components BP180 and BP230. The mainstay of therapy is topical and systemic corticosteroids (CS) and immunosuppressors. As this pathology mainly involves the elderly, subjects often have numerous comorbidities that influence the clinical management. Omalizumab is a recombinant humanized monoclonal anti-IgE antibody which has recently emerged as a promising treatment for BP in patients for whom CS are contraindicated or conventional treatments have failed to control the disease. For this study, we selected five patients who presented with corticosteroid-dependent BP with a contraindication to the use of other immunosuppressive treatments. The objectives of our study were to evaluate the effectiveness of omalizumab in controlling BP and allowing to decrease the dosage of systemic CS, assessing the effects of omalizumab on the clinical manifestations and the titers of circulating anti-BP180 and BP230 antibodies, IgE and eosinophils. A reduction in the dose of systemic CS was possible in 100% of the patients and complete resolution of the clinical picture was seen in 100% for skin lesions and in 40% for pruritus. A reduction of circulating IgE was found in 40%, anti-BP180 and BP230 IgGs were decreased in 60% and eosinophils in 80%.

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