Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Systematic Review
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The outcome of partial pulpotomy in traumatized permanent anterior teeth - A systematic review and meta-analysis.

Background: Partial pulpotomy is a procedural intervention that can maintain the vitality of pulp during the management of traumatized permanent teeth with pulpal involvement.

Aim: To evaluate whether partial pulpotomy can be considered a reliable conservative treatment option for treating traumatized permanent anterior teeth with pulpal involvement.

Methodology: A computerized systematic search was performed in PubMed, Science Direct, Cochrane, and LILACS databases from 1980 to May 2021. Five studies were included in the final analysis. Quality assessment, Meta-analysis, and Publication bias of the studies were evaluated. This systematic review was registered in PROSPERO (ID - CRD42021262031).

Result: The comprehensive Meta-Analysis Software was used. The test of the heterogeneity was analysed using Cochran's Q statistics. The Q value was 7.186 (df = 6) with a P value of 0.3 and I2 as 16.5%. The studies were considered homogenous, and the fixed-effect model showed an overall point estimate of 0.89 with a 95% confidence interval (0.86-0.91). The Begg and Egger funnel plot indicated that there was no publication bias in the included studies.

Conclusion: Evidence indicates that partial pulpotomy may be considered a reliable definitive treatment option in asymptomatic traumatized permanent anterior teeth with exposed pulp rather than total pulpotomy.

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