JOURNAL ARTICLE
REVIEW
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Prone cardiopulmonary resuscitation: Relevance in current times.

The most common and recommended position for performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is the supine position. However, clinicians may encounter situations when patients suffer cardiac arrest in prone position. Prone CPR has been described previously in a number of settings, most commonly intraoperative. In the current COVID-19 era, with more patients being nursed in prone position, an increase in the incidence of cardiac arrests requiring prone CPR is expected. Hence most of the resuscitation guidelines have made prone CPR a vital component of their recommendations. To date, most of our health-care workers have limited knowledge about prone resuscitation and the literature surrounding it. Nonetheless, with the current evidence at hand, it seems to be a reliable method of providing resuscitation and all health-care workers should be well versed with it. Thus, the goal of this narrative review is to try and fill the gaps in our knowledge about prone CPR. Literature search was done on PubMed, Medline, EMBASE using keywords 'CPR', 'Resuscitation', 'Prone Position', 'Prone', 'Prone CPR'.

Full text links

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Group 7SearchHeart failure treatmentPapersTopicsCollectionsEffects of Sodium-Glucose Cotransporter 2 Inhibitors for the Treatment of Patients With Heart Failure Importance: Only 1 class of glucose-lowering agents-sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors-has been reported to decrease the risk of cardiovascular events primarily by reducingSeptember 1, 2017: JAMA CardiologyAssociations of albuminuria in patients with chronic heart failure: findings in the ALiskiren Observation of heart Failure Treatment study.CONCLUSIONS: Increased UACR is common in patients with heart failure, including non-diabetics. Urinary albumin creatininineJul, 2011: European Journal of Heart FailureRandomized Controlled TrialEffects of Liraglutide on Clinical Stability Among Patients With Advanced Heart Failure and Reduced Ejection Fraction: A Randomized Clinical Trial.Review

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Read by QxMD is copyright © 2021 QxMD Software Inc. All rights reserved. By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app