Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Anti-alpha-galactosyl antibodies and immune complexes in children with Henoch-Schönlein purpura or IgA nephropathy.

Episodes of hematuria in IgA nephropathy or Henoch-Schönlein purpura are frequently associated with microbial infections. Some of those infectious agents bear alpha-galactosyl residues on their cell surface. These observations prompted us to determine, by passive hemagglutination, the titers of natural anti-galactosyl antibodies in the serum of children presenting with Henoch-Schönlein purpura (10 cases) or IgA nephropathy (7 cases). Antibody titers of normal subjects (103 cases), children with a pharyngitis of unknown etiology (7 cases), and children exhibiting mesangial IgA deposits but no hematuria at the time of testing (6 cases) ranged from 1:20 to 1:80. Elevated titers (greater than 1:80) were observed in nine of 11 patients with mesangial IgA deposits and micro- or macroscopic hematuria, in nine of 19 children with other evolutive glomerular diseases (5 cases of acute glomerulonephritis and 4 cases of minimal change disease), and in most subjects presenting with a M. pneumoniae (4/5 cases) or a E. Coli (4/5 cases) infection. Antibody titers decreased after incubation of normal and pathological sera with D-galactose (10 mM) or with alpha-galactosyl-glucoside (10 mM), but not with D-glucose (10 mM). The anti-alpha-galactosyl antibodies purified, by affinity chromatography, from sera of 10 normal children, 10 pathological controls and four children with mesangial IgA deposits without hematuria belonged to IgG class. In contrast, both IgG and IgA anti-alpha-galactosyl antibodies were detected in six of six patients with mesangial IgA deposits and hematuria. The IgA content of immune complexes detected in those patients decreased after incubation of sera with alpha-galactosyl-glucoside, but not with D-glucose.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app