Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Risk of major malformations in infants after first-trimester exposure to benzodiazepines: Results from the Massachusetts General Hospital National Pregnancy Registry for Psychiatric Medications.

BACKGROUND: Perinatal anxiety affects 20% of women, and untreated maternal mental illness can cause deleterious effects for women and their children. Benzodiazepines are commonly used to treat anxiety disorders. The reported risk of congenital malformations after in utero benzodiazepine exposure has been inconsistent.

METHODS: The Massachusetts General Hospital National Pregnancy Registry for Psychiatric Medications prospectively enrolls pregnant women with psychiatric illness who take one or more psychiatric medications. Participants are interviewed twice during pregnancy and at 12 weeks postpartum. Women taking any benzodiazepine during the first trimester of pregnancy were compared with a group of women taking psychiatric medication(s) other than benzodiazepines during pregnancy.

RESULTS: A total of 1053 women were eligible for this analysis; N = 151 women who had taken a benzodiazepine during the first trimester, and the comparison group was N = 902 women. There were 5 (3.21%) major malformations in the exposure group and 32 (3.46%) in the comparison group (odds ratio 0.92; 95% confidence interval 0.35-2.41).

CONCLUSION: This ongoing pregnancy registry offers reassurance that benzodiazepines do not appear to have major teratogenic effects. The precision of relative risk estimate will improve as the number of participants increases. This and other pregnancy registries will better inform the reproductive safety of benzodiazepines.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app