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An 18-Year-Old Female Experiences Unilateral Vocal Cord Paralysis during Mild COVID-19 Infection.

The COVID-19 pandemic has shown with certainty that SARS-CoV-2 can cause a variety of clinical findings, with some of the most notable being lasting chemosensory changes. Severe infections with SARS-CoV-2 can also lead to a variety of complications. For example, vocal cord paralysis can be caused by trauma sustained during intubation, which is a necessary procedure for many severe cases. Rarely, SARS-CoV-2 related vocal cord paralysis has occurred outside the context of intubation. These cases contribute to an emerging assortment of evidence supporting the neuropathic capacity of SARS-CoV-2. This report documents a case of COVID-19 related vocal cord paralysis in an 18-year-old female. The patient had a significant history of muscle tension dysphonia, chronic laryngitis, and vocal cord nodules. The patient developed vocal cord paralysis concurrently with the onset of mild viral symptoms and was never intubated or hospitalized. Based on the onset of symptoms and other causes being excluded with CT, a diagnosis of COVID-19-related vocal cord paralysis was performed.

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