Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Increased proportions of inflammatory T cells and their correlations with cytokines and clinical parameters in patients with ankylosing spondylitis from northern Sweden.

Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is an autoimmune disease affecting parts of the skeletal structure in particular. Previously increased levels of the inflammatory cell types Th17, Th22, Tc17 and Tc22 cells have been shown to be associated with AS. Here, we analysed the levels of inflammatory T cell subsets, related cytokines and clinical characteristics of AS patients vs controls from northern Sweden. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) obtained from 50 AS patients and 50 matched controls were short term stimulated with PMA/Ionomycin, stained and analysed by flow cytometry. Plasma levels of Interleukin (IL)-17, IL-22, IL-10 as well as clinically relevant markers were determined. Compared to male controls, male AS patients showed 1.5- to 2-fold increases of Th17 (P = .013), Th22 (P = .003) and Tc22 (P = .024) among CD45+ CD3+ lymphocytes. Plasma IL-22 levels correlated with the Tc17 proportion in male patients (Rs  = 0.499, P = .003) and plasma IL-10 levels were inversely correlated with Tc17 among all patients (Rs  = -0.276, P = .05). Male patients with syndesmophytes showed significantly higher Th17 proportions (P = .038). In female AS patients, Tc22 was negatively correlated with C-reactive protein (high sensitivity) (hsCRP) (Rs  = -0.573, P = .016). We confirmed increased proportions of inflammatory T cells and correlations with relevant cytokines from male AS patients. The correlation between Th17 and syndesmophytes supports a role of Th17 in the pathogenic process.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app