JOURNAL ARTICLE
RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Paternal prevalence and risk factors for comorbid depression and anxiety across the first 2 years postpartum: A nationwide Canadian cohort study.

OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of comorbid depression and anxiety symptoms in fathers and investigate the predictors for comorbidity during the first- and second-year following birth.

METHODS: In a longitudinal Canadian study, couples were recruited within 3 weeks of childbirth. Fathers completed a survey after the birth of their child followed by questionnaires at 3, 6, 9, 12, 18, and 24 months postpartum on paternal depression and anxiety symptoms and potential risk factors. Sequential logistic regression was used for analysis.

RESULTS: Of the 3217 enrolled fathers, 2544 (79.08%) provided data for at least one time point during the first year postpartum and 2442 (75.29%) in the second year. Overall, 569 fathers (22.4%) had comorbid depression and anxiety symptoms at some point during the first year postpartum (2.2% at baseline to 8.9% at 6 months), and 323 fathers (13.2%) had comorbidity at some point during their second year postpartum (8.1% at 18 months and 8.6% at 24 months). Strongest risk factors associated with paternal comorbidity were poor or fair perceived health at 4 weeks postpartum, depression before pregnancy, anxiety in the current pregnancy, significant adverse childhood experiences, positive ADHD screen, and victim of intimate partner violence.

CONCLUSION: High rates of comorbidity among fathers in the first 2 years postpartum demonstrate the importance of perinatal mental health management at a family level. The identification of important modifiable comorbidity risk factors highlights areas for further research and the development of interventions to support paternal mental health to optimize child and family outcomes.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app