Journal Article
Observational Study
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Evaluation of Clinical Efficacy and Safety of Prolonged Treatment of Vernal and Atopic Keratoconjunctivitis Using Topical Tacrolimus.

Cornea 2022 January 2
PURPOSE: To evaluate the clinical improvement and safety of prolonged treatment of vernal (VKC) and atopic keratoconjunctivitis (AKC) using topical tacrolimus.

METHODS: We included 36 eyes of 36 patients who had VKC and AKC and were treated with topical tacrolimus ophthalmic suspension (0.1%) for 24 months. The demographic data of the enrolled patients were collected from their medical files. Clinical scores, remission rates, number of relapses, concomitant use of steroids, and refractory indices were assessed. Clinical outcomes were determined using papillae-limbus-cornea (PLC) scores and 5-5-5 exacerbation grading scale scores. Clinical characteristics associated with the need for concomitant steroid eye drops administration were determined using logistic regression analysis. All patients were classified into 3 subgroups using cluster analysis.

RESULTS: PLC scores recorded in the sixth month were significantly improved compared with those recorded at baseline. PLC scores recorded in the 18th, 21st, and 24th months were significantly improved compared with those recorded in the sixth month. The remission rates increased diachronically and significantly, reaching 92% in the 24th month. Logistic regression analysis showed that, for every 10-year increase in patient age, the risk for requiring concomitant administration of steroid eye drops was reduced by half (odds ratio, 0.53; 95% confidence interval, 0.29-0.96). Using cluster analysis, the patients were divided into 3 clusters: adolescent type, pediatric type, and adult type.

CONCLUSIONS: Two years of treatment with topical tacrolimus ophthalmic suspension is an effective method for inducing and maintaining the stable stages of VKC and AKC.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app