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Advances in dementia with Lewy bodies.

Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) is a clinical diagnosis representing a specific presentation of a pathological α-synucleinopathy (Lewy body disease). DLB is one entity under the broader term Lewy body dementia , which also includes Parkinson's disease dementia. Recent advances in DLB include publication of updated diagnostic criteria and recognition of prodromal DLB states, including mild cognitive impairment, delirium-onset, and psychiatric-onset forms. Research criteria for the mild cognitive impairment form of DLB were published in 2020. Increasing research shows that concomitant Alzheimer's disease pathology in individuals with DLB is common in addition to the α-synucleinopathy pathology. This has implications for biomarker use and expected progression. Identifying biomarkers for DLB is an area of active research. Cerebrospinal fluid and skin biopsy tests are now commercially available in the United States, but their role in routine clinical care is not yet established. Additional research and biomarkers are needed. Research suggests that median survival after DLB diagnosis is 3-4 years, but there are rapidly and slowly progressive forms. Most individuals with DLB die of complications of the disease. Clinical trials for individuals with DLB have increased over the last 5 years, targeting both symptoms and underlying pathology. Effective therapies remain an unmet need, however. This review focuses on recent advances with an emphasis on literature that informs clinical care.

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