Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Long-term survival in patients with isolated pulmonary valve stenosis: a not so benign disease?

Open Heart 2021 September
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: During the last decades, the survival rates in patients with congenital heart disease have increased dramatically, particularly in patients with complex heart malformations. However, the survival in patients with simple defects is still unknown. We aimed to determine the characteristics and the risk of mortality in patients with isolated pulmonary valve stenosis (PS).

METHODS: Swedish inpatient, outpatient and cause of death registries were used to identify patients born between 1970 and 2017 with a diagnosis of PS, without any other concomitant congenital heart lesion. For each patient with PS, 10 control individuals without congenital heart disease were matched by birth year and sex from the total population registry. We used median-unbiased method and Kaplan-Meier survival analysis to examine the risk of mortality.

RESULTS: We included 3910 patients with PS and 38 770 matched controls. The median age of diagnosis of PS was 0.7 years (IQR 0.3-7.0). During a median follow-up of 13.5 years (IQR 6.5-23.5), 88 patients with PS and 192 controls died; 500 patients with PS (12%) underwent at least one transcatheter or surgical valve intervention. The overall mortality rate was significantly higher in patients with PS compared with matched controls (HR 4.67, 95% CI 3.61 to 5.99, p=0.001). Patients with an early diagnosis of PS (0-1 year) had the highest risk of mortality (HR 10.99, 95% CI 7.84 to 15.45).

CONCLUSIONS: In this nationwide, register-based cohort study, we found that the risk of mortality in patients with PS is almost five times higher compared with matched controls. Patients with an early diagnosis of PS appears to be the most vulnerable group and the regular follow-up in tertiary congenital heart units may be the key to prevention.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app