Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Review
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Mycoplasma genitalium infection in women reporting dysuria: A pilot study and review of the literature.

Mycoplasma genitalium (MG) infection, a sexually transmitted infection (STI), causes cervicitis and may cause reproductive sequelae and adverse pregnancy outcomes. Some MG-infected women report dysuria, a symptom frequently attributed to urinary tract infection (UTI). Given potential MG-associated morbidity and the likelihood that UTI treatment would be ineffective in eradicating MG, an improved understanding of MG infection frequency and clinical significance in young women reporting dysuria is needed. We conducted MG testing on stored urogenital specimens collected in a pilot study on frequency of STIs in young women presenting to an emergency department for dysuria evaluation and performed a literature review on MG infection frequency in women reporting dysuria. Among 25 women presenting for dysuria evaluation in our pilot study, 6 (24.0%) had MG detected and one-third had co-infection with chlamydia and one-third with trichomoniasis; half with MG detected did not receive an antibiotic with known efficacy against MG, while the other half received azithromycin. In five studies identified in the literature review, dysuria was reported by 7%-19% of women and MG detected in 5%-22%. MG infection is common in young women with dysuria and empiric UTI treatment may not be effective against MG. Studies evaluating the clinical significance of MG infection in women reporting dysuria are needed.

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