Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
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Associated factors, post infection child growth, and household cost of invasive enteritis among under 5 children in Bangladesh.

Scientific Reports 2021 June 18
Both Campylobacter- and Shigella-induced invasive enteritis are common in under-5 Bangladeshi children. Our study aimed to determine the factors associated with Campylobacter and Shigella enteritis among under-5 children, the post-infection worsening growth, and the household cost of invasive enteritis. Data of children having Shigella (591/803) and Campylobacter (246/1148) isolated from the fecal specimen in Bangladesh were extracted from the Global Enteric Multicenter Study (GEMS) for the period December 2007 to March 2011. In multiple logistic regression analysis, fever was observed more frequently among shigellosis cases [adjusted OR 2.21; (95% CI 1.58, 3.09)]. Breastfeeding [aOR 0.55; (95% CI 0.37, 0.81)] was found to be protective against Shigella. The generalized estimating equations multivariable model identified a negative association between Shigella and weight-for-height z score [aOR - 0.11; (95% CI - 0.21, - 0.001)]; a positive association between symptomatic Campylobacter and weight-for-age z score [aOR 0.22; (95% CI 0.06, 0.37)] and weight-for-height z score [aOR 0.22; (95% CI 0.08, 0.37)]. Total costs incurred by households were more in shigellosis children than Campylobacter-induced enteritis ($4.27 vs. $3.49). Households with low-level maternal education tended to incur less cost in case of their shigellosis children. Our findings underscore the need for preventive strategies targeting Shigella infection, which could potentially reduce the disease burden, associated household costs, and child growth faltering.

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