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2021Total Fertility Rates, by Maternal Educational Attainment and Race and Hispanic Origin: United States, 2019.

Objective-This report presents 2019 total fertility rates for the United States, by educational attainment and race and Hispanic origin of mother. Methods-Descriptive tabulations of the total fertility rate by educational attainment of mother for the United States are presented and described. The total fertility rate is the average number of children a group of women would expect to have at the end of their reproductive lifetimes. Data are based on the 2003 revision of the U.S. Standard Certificate of Live Birth. Results-In 2019, the U.S. total fertility rate (TFR) for all women aged 15-49 was 1,705 expected births per 1,000 women. TFRs decreased as level of education increased from women with a 12th grade education or less through an associate's and bachelor's degree, and then rose from bachelor's degree through a doctorate or professional degree. Among the race and Hispanic-origin groups, TFRs were highest for Hispanic women (1,939), followed by non-Hispanic black (1,774) and non-Hispanic white (1,610) women. Rates generally declined from the lowest educational level through a bachelor's degree for non-Hispanic white women, and through an associate's degree for Hispanic women, and then generally rose for both groups for women with advanced degrees. TFRs for non-Hispanic black women declined by educational level through a master's degree. Across the race and Hispanic-origin groups, the lowest TFR by educational level was for non-Hispanic black women with a master's degree (1,038), and the highest was for Hispanic women with a 12th grade education or less (3,025). TFRs for non-Hispanic black and Hispanic women with some college credit or less were generally higher than the rates for non-Hispanic white women, but TFRs for non-Hispanic black and Hispanic women with a master's degree or more were generally lower than the rates for non-Hispanic white women.

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