JOURNAL ARTICLE

Diagnostic value of penile color doppler ultrasonography in patients with veno-occlusive erectile dysfunction

A Soylu, M Sarier, R Kutlu
Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice 2021, 24 (4): 551-554
33851677

Background: The method used in the first assessment of patients with veno-occlusive erectile dysfunction (ED) is penile color doppler ultrasonography (PCDU). However, cavernosography performed following intracavernosal pharmacostimulation is accepted as a more precise method for showing venous leakage.

Aims: The objectives of this study were to compare results obtained from patients undergoing PCDU, and those undergoing cavernosography, and to investigate the diagnostic value of PCDU in the diagnosis.

Methods: A total of 133 patients who presented at the urology clinic due to ED have veno-occlusive dysfunction (VOD) detected as a result of PCDU and underwent cavernosography for further assessment when scheduled for penile embolization. The results obtained were retrospectively evaluated.

Results: The mean age of 133 patients with VOD identified as a result of PCDU was 48.7 ± 11.2 years. In cavernosography performed after PCDU, venous leakage was detected in 127 patients (95.49%), while no leakage was found in six patients (4.51%). Bilateral venous leakage was found in 91.34% (n:116), right venous leakage in 5.51% (n:7), and left venous leakage in 3.15% (n:4) of the patients with venous leakage.

Conclusion: Evaluating the cavernosography results, PCDU alone is often sufficient to diagnose veno-occlusive ED. Cavernosography is a more invasive diagnostic method compared to PCDU that is adequate in cases where venous surgery or embolization is not considered, and cavernosography is not recommended in these patients.

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