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How Can a Multidisciplinary Approach Improve Prognosis of Soft-Tissue Sarcomas of Extremities?

Soft-tissue sarcomas are malignant tumors that require good management within specialized centers. Our study aims to assess the benefit of handling these kinds of tumors using the Multidisciplinary Meeting (MDM) approach. The current paper details this approach through a prospective study that has lasted for 42 months in the HASSAN II University Hospital Center, Fez, Morocco. During this research work, 116 cases were selected with an average age of 53 years. In 95.7% of the cases, it was found that the lower limb was the most frequent tumor type (78.4%). Also, ninety-two (92) patients (79.3%) have had a prior biopsy. Ninety-nine (99) patients (85.3%) have received a magnetic resonance imaging scan (MRI) before surgery. Sixty-three (63) patients were operated on, including R0 resection used for 37 patients, R1 used for 21 patients, and R2 used for five patients. As a result, liposarcomas were the most frequent type (30.1%), followed by synovial sarcomas (14.6%), leiomyosarcomas (9.5%), ewing sarcoma (8.6), and undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcomas (7.7%). In addition, neoadjuvant chemotherapy was used for 36 patients. The other 22 patients received adjuvant chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. The overall survival rate was 60.56 months, which proves a significant improvement, thanks to the multidisciplinary meeting approach. Conclusion . The conducted investigation has shown that using MDM for managing soft-tissue sarcomas of extremities improves the patients' survival rate. Moreover, results have proven MDM might allow optimal treatment regarding less local recurrence and metastasis.

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