JOURNAL ARTICLE
RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
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Clinical characteristics of IgG4-related retroperitoneal fibrosis versus idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis.

Retroperitoneal fibrosis (RPF) is an uncommon condition characterized by inflammation and fibrosis in the retroperitoneal space. More than two-thirds of RPF are idiopathic, with the remaining stemed from a variety of secondary causes. It was suggested that IgG4-related RPF is a secondary form of RPF. We undertook this study to compare detailed demographic, clinical and laboratory characteristics of IgG4-related RPF and IRPF in a large Chinese cohort. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 132 RPF patients diagnosed at Peking University People's Hospital between March 2010 and March 2018. Among the 132 patients, the mean age at disease onset was 54.8 years. IgG4-related RPF group showed greater male predominance compared to IRPF group. IgG4-related RPF patients showed a longer interval between symptom onset and diagnosis, and allergic diseases were more common in this group. Sixty-four patients (48.4%) had lower back pain, which was more common in IRPF group than that in IgG4-related RPF patients. In terms of organ involvement, although 42 of 47 patients (89.3%) with IgG4-related RPF had other organ involvement, there were no patients in the IRPF group with other organ involvement. In addition, the serum IgG4 level, elevated eosinophils counts and IgE level were significantly higher in IgG4-related RPF patients. We described the demographic, clinical and laboratory differences between IgG4-related RPF and IRPF patients, indicating their potential differences in pathogenesis, which was of great importance to diagnose and manage the two phenotypes.

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