JOURNAL ARTICLE
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Predictors of persistent concussion symptoms in adults with acute mild traumatic brain injury presenting to the emergency department.

CJEM 2021 May
OBJECTIVE: To identify risk factors associated with persistent concussion symptoms in adults presenting to the emergency department (ED) with acute mild traumatic brain injury (TBI).

METHODS: This was a secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial conducted in three Canadian EDs whereby the intervention had no impact on recovery or healthcare utilization outcomes. Adult (18-64 years) patients with a mild TBI sustained within the preceding 48 h were eligible for enrollment. The primary outcome was the presence of persistent concussion symptoms at 30 days, defined as the presence of ≥ 3 symptoms on the Rivermead Post-concussion Symptoms Questionnaire.

RESULTS: Of the 241 patients who completed follow-up, median (IQR) age was 33 (25 to 50) years, and 147 (61.0%) were female. At 30 days, 49 (20.3%) had persistent concussion symptoms. Using multivariable logistic regression, headache at ED presentation (OR: 7.7; 95% CI 1.6 to 37.8), being under the influence of drugs or alcohol at the time of injury (OR: 5.9; 95% CI 1.8 to 19.4), the injury occurring via bike or motor vehicle collision (OR: 2.9; 95% CI 1.3 to 6.0), history of anxiety or depression (OR: 2.4; 95% CI 1.2 to 4.9), and numbness or tingling at ED presentation (OR: 2.4; 95% CI 1.1 to 5.2), were found to be independently associated with persistent concussion symptoms at 30 days.

CONCLUSIONS: Five variables were found to be significant predictors of persistent concussion symptoms. Although mild TBI is mostly a self-limited condition, patients with these risk factors should be considered high risk for developing persistent concussion symptoms and flagged for early outpatient follow-up.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app