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Evaluating Cefiderocol in the Treatment of Multidrug-Resistant Gram-Negative Bacilli: A Review of the Emerging Data.

Infections due to multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria (MDR-GNB), especially when carbapenem resistant, have been very difficult to manage in the last fifteen years, owing to the paucity of dependable therapeutic options. Cefiderocol is a siderophore cephalosporin recently approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and European Medicines Agency (EMA) that may have the potential to fill some of the remaining gaps in the treatment of MDR-GNB infections. Among others, cefiderocol demonstrated in vitro activity against carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii and metallo-β-lactamases producers. Clinical data from both registrative studies and post-marketing experiences are essential to confirm whether these promises from in vitro studies could readily translate into clinical practice, as well as to delineate the precise place in therapy for cefiderocol for the treatment of MDR-GNB in the near future. Because of its unique potential, it is essential to provide both randomized controlled trials (RCT) and real-life data to improve the ability of clinicians to exploit its benefit in both empirical and targeted treatment of MDR-GNB infections. In this narrative review, we discuss the emerging data from pivotal RCT and initial real-life experiences on the use of cefiderocol for the treatment of MDR-GNB infections.

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