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Endovascular Treatment of Critical Limb Ischemia in Buerger Disease (Thromboangiitis Obliterans) With Midterm Follow-Up: A Viable Option When Bypass Surgery Is Not Feasible.

OBJECTIVE. Thromboangiitis obliterans (TAO) is an occlusive inflammatory disease affecting small- and medium-sized vessels that causes decrease in life quality and eventually limb loss. The only proven treatment method is smoking cessation, but it may be insufficient for limb salvage in patients with critical limb ischemia. In this single-center retrospective study, the feasibility and efficiency of endovascular treatment in TAO were evaluated. MATERIALS AND METHODS. After approval of the local institutional review board, 41 patients who underwent endovascular treatment of TAO between January 2014 and June 2019 were evaluated retrospectively. Technical success and procedure-related complications were recorded. Decrease in Rutherford classification score, relief of pain, and wound healing were evaluated to determine clinical success. Primary patency, limb salvage rate, and amputation-free survival were also evaluated. RESULTS. A total of 45 limbs were treated during the study period. Technical success was achieved in 82.2% of procedures. Mean follow-up was 29.8 months. Clinical improvement was achieved in 35 limbs. Three patients underwent major amputation and 12 patients underwent minor amputation. Amputation-free survival and limb salvage were both 93.3% at both 1 and 2 years. Reintervention was performed in 14 patients because of occlusion and clinical relapsing of the symptoms. CONCLUSION. Endovascular treatment of TAO is feasible, has a potential to prevent limb amputation in patients with critical limb ischemia, and has acceptable technical success and limb salvage rates. Because there is no consensus in treatment of TAO, prospective comparative studies are needed to determine the effectiveness of an endovascular approach.

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