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Kimura Disease: A Case Series and Systematic Review of Clinico-radiological Features.

Kimura disease is a rare chronic inflammatory disorder mostly reported in males in second to third decades from south-east Asia. Head and neck is the most commonly involved region. The usual presentation is painless facial swelling with salivary gland involvement and regional lymphadenopathy. The diagnosis can be suspected on imaging but needs to be proven on histopathology. We describe three histopathology proven cases of Kimura disease and emphasize the specific clinic-radiological findings which can help in early identification of the condition and its differentiation from other diseases with similar presentation. Gray scale Ultrasound, contrast-enhanced ultrasound, and contrast-enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (CE-MRI) were done in all patients and Computed Tomography (CT) was done in one. The salient imaging features were ill-defined solid mass in the subcutaneous location of the facial region which was heteroechoic on Gray scale Ultrasound, heterogeneously hyperintense on T2W MRI and without much diffusion restriction. There was involvement of salivary glands with ipsilateral cervical adenopathy. The lesion showed avid contrast enhancement on contrast-enhanced ultrasound and CE-MRI. We also present a systematic literature review of clinico-radiological features in Kimura disease in the head and neck. The articles with histopathologically proven cases and satisfactory description of imaging findings were included and we have compared the findings in our cases with published literature. In addition, we have included examples of radiological mimics of this disease. Certain imaging findings are highly suggestive and can aid in early diagnosis of Kimura disease which helps in early initiation of treatment with better patient prognosis.

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