JOURNAL ARTICLE

Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of N-acetyl Aspartate in Chronic Schizophrenia, First Episode of Psychosis and High-Risk of Psychosis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

Thomas Samuel Whitehurst, Martin Osugo, Leigh Townsend, Ekaterina Shatalina, Robert Vava, Ellis Chika Onwordi, Oliver Howes
Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews 2020 October 14
33068555
N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA) is a readily measured marker of neuronal metabolism. Previous analyses in schizophrenia have shown NAA levels are low in frontal, temporal and thalamic regions, but may be underpowered to detect effects in some regions, high-risk of psychosis and between illness stages. We searched for magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies comparing NAA in chronic schizophrenia, first episode psychosis and high risk of psychosis to controls. 182 studies were included and meta-analysed using a random-effects model for each region and illness stage. NAA levels were significantly lower than controls in the frontal lobe [Hedge's g = -0.36, p < 0.001], hippocampus [-0.52, p < 0.001], temporal lobe [-0.35, p = 0.031], thalamus [-0.32, p = 0.012] and parietal lobe [-0.25, p = 0.028] in chronic schizophrenia, and lower than controls in the frontal lobe [-0.26, p = 0.002], anterior cingulate cortex [-0.24, p = 0.016] and thalamus [-0.28, p = 0.028] in first episode psychosis. NAA was lower in high-risk for psychosis in the hippocampus [-0.20, p = 0.049]. In schizophrenia, NAA alterations appear to begin in hippocampus, frontal cortex and thalamus, and extend later to many other regions.

Full Text Links

Find Full Text Links for this Article

Discussion

You are not logged in. Sign Up or Log In to join the discussion.

Trending Papers

Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
33068555
×

Save your favorite articles in one place with a free QxMD account.

×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"