JOURNAL ARTICLE
RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
SYSTEMATIC REVIEW
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Weight bias and health care utilization: a scoping review.

AIM: The purpose of this scoping review was to explore the evidence on how perceptions and/or experiences of weight bias in primary health care influence engagement with and utilization of health care services by individuals with obesity.

BACKGROUND: Prior studies have found discrepancies in the use of health care services by individuals living with obesity; a greater body mass index has been associated with decreased health care utilization, and weight bias has been identified as a major barrier to engagement with health services.

METHODS: PubMed was searched from January 2000 to July 2017. Four reviewers independently selected 21 studies examining perceptions of weight bias and its impact on engagement with primary health care services.

FINDINGS: A thematic analysis was conducted on the 21 studies that were included in this scoping review. The following 10 themes were identified: contemptuous, patronizing, and disrespectful treatment, lack of training, ambivalence, attribution of all health issues to excess weight, assumptions about weight gain, barriers to health care utilization, expectation of differential health care treatment, low trust and poor communication, avoidance or delay of health services, and 'doctor shopping'. Overall, our scoping review reveals how perceptions and/or experiences of weight bias from primary care health professionals negatively influence patient engagement with primary health care services.

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