RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Prevalence of skin picking (excoriation) disorder.

Skin picking (excoriation) disorder is a mental health condition characterized by repetitive picking of one's skin leading to tissue damage as well as functional impairment and/or distress. A convenience sampling of 10,169 adults, aged 18-69 years, representative of the general US population, completed a survey to establish occurrence of skin picking disorder. 213 participants (2.1%) (55.4% female) identified as having current skin picking disorder and 318 (3.1%) (54.1% female) reported lifetime skin picking disorder (i.e. current or past). Those with current skin picking disorder were significantly more likely to be female compared to those who never had skin picking (Likelihood Ratio, LR chi-square = 31.705, p < 0.001). Mental health comorbidities were common with generalized anxiety disorder (63.4%), depression (53.1%), and panic disorder (27.7%) being the most frequently endorsed. This study suggests that skin picking disorder is relatively common in the general population and typically characterized by high rates of comorbidity.

Full text links

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Group 7SearchHeart failure treatmentPapersTopicsCollectionsEffects of Sodium-Glucose Cotransporter 2 Inhibitors for the Treatment of Patients With Heart Failure Importance: Only 1 class of glucose-lowering agents-sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors-has been reported to decrease the risk of cardiovascular events primarily by reducingSeptember 1, 2017: JAMA CardiologyAssociations of albuminuria in patients with chronic heart failure: findings in the ALiskiren Observation of heart Failure Treatment study.CONCLUSIONS: Increased UACR is common in patients with heart failure, including non-diabetics. Urinary albumin creatininineJul, 2011: European Journal of Heart FailureRandomized Controlled TrialEffects of Liraglutide on Clinical Stability Among Patients With Advanced Heart Failure and Reduced Ejection Fraction: A Randomized Clinical Trial.Review

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Read by QxMD is copyright © 2021 QxMD Software Inc. All rights reserved. By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app