JOURNAL ARTICLE

Management of postoperative pain in ophthalmic plastic surgery: a major review

Edward J Wladis, Michael I Rothschild, Tal J Rubinstein
Orbit 2020 July 16, : 1-5
32669009

PURPOSE: Clinicians are becoming increasingly aware of the risks of opioid analgesics, and, consequently, are searching for alternatives to these agents. This review considers the existing literature regarding the management of pain after ophthalmic plastic surgery.

METHODS: A literature search was performed through the PubMed database. Articles were assessed for relevance, and the appropriate data was extracted from the medical literature regarding pain management strategies after oculoplastic procedures.

RESULTS: An emerging body of literature suggests the efficacy of a variety of non-narcotic agents in post-operative pain management. Many of these medications prevent the development of pain, and several have been studied in randomized trials. Specifically, pregabalin, ketorolac, acetaminophen, memantine, local anesthetics, and alternative therapies all have documented benefit in this setting.

CONCLUSIONS: Several medications may prevent and treat pain after ophthalmic plastic surgery. These agents are well-tolerated, and many decrease the requirement for opioid analgesics. Clinicians should be aware of these therapies when considering non-narcotic pain management.

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