JOURNAL ARTICLE

Fragility Fractures of the Pelvic Ring - Does the Evidence of Oedema Lead us to More Surgeries?

Patricia Lang, Manuel Sterneder, Hans-Joachim Riesner, Carsten Hackenbroch, Benedikt Friemert, Hans-Georg Palm
Zeitschrift Für Orthopädie und Unfallchirurgie 2020 July 13
32659834

INTRODUCTION: The choice of therapy for fragility fractures of the pelvis (FFP) is largely determined by the diagnosed fracture morphology. It is now unclear whether the change in diagnostic options - sensitive detection of fracture oedema in the sacrum using MRI and dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) - has an impact on the therapeutic consequences. The aim of this retrospective study was therefore to evaluate the change in the diagnostics used and the resulting therapy regimen in our patient population.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: We performed a monocentric-retrospective analysis of 196 patients with a fragility fracture of the pelvis in our clinic (national TraumaZentrum® DGU and SAV approval) in the period from 2008 to 2017. We examined changes in epidemiology, diagnostics/classification and therapy of the pelvic ring fractures treated by us.

RESULTS: The diagnostic procedures used are subject to a clear change towards oedema detection using MRI and DECT. The graduation has changed towards more severe forms of fracture after FFP. There is now also an increasing proportion of patients treated by surgery (2008 - 2009: 5.3% vs. 2015 - 2017: 60.3%).

CONCLUSION: We were able to show that the introduction of sensitive diagnostic procedures coincided with a higher classification of the fractures. It is also noteworthy that the increase in operations is not only due to a higher degree of classification; also in relative terms, more patients are operated on within type FFP II.

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