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Hypereosinophilic Syndrome, Multiorgan Involvement and Response to Imatinib.

Curēus 2020 June 8
Hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES) is an uncommon syndrome characterized by peripheral blood eosinophils count of more than 1,500/mm3 with associated tissue damage. It can be either primary or secondary, for example, due to parasitic infections or inflammation. We present a case of a 49-year-old Asian female with recurrent hospital admissions for cholecystitis, gastritis, urinary cystitis, and pancreatitis. Her peripheral blood count showed excessive eosinophils 15,600-19,000/mm3 on different occasions. Pathology of her gallbladder and her gastric biopsies showed eosinophilic infiltration. Her bone marrow biopsy showed a normocellular marrow with active trilineage hematopoiesis, eosinophilia, mild megakaryocytic hyperplasia with a few atypical forms, and mild T-cell lymphocytosis. Flow cytometry showed no evidence of acute leukemia, or T-cell or B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder. On fluorescent in-situ hybridization (FISH), myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) testing was negative for platelet-derived growth factor receptor-alpha (PDGFRA), platelet-derived growth factor receptor-beta (PDGFRB), and fibroblast growth factor receptor-1 (FGFR1) rearrangement. Despite not having the FIP1L1-PDGFRA (factor interacting with PAPOLA and CPSF1-platelet-derived growth factor receptor, alpha polypeptide) gene fusion, our patient responded to the treatment with a significant decrease in her absolute eosinophils count and resolution of her symptoms.

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