Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Clinical characteristics of herpes zoster laryngitis.

INTRODUCTION: Herpes zoster laryngitis (HZL) is a recently recognized rare disease, easily mistaken for common viral laryngopharyngitis. There are only a few case reports in the English literature. No study has evaluated the clinical characteristics of HZL. In this study, we analyzed the clinical characteristics of HZL and compared them to those of Ramsay Hunt syndrome (RHS).

MATERIALS AND METHODS: Seventy-three patients who were initially diagnosed with HZL or RHS were enrolled in this study. Their medical records, including laryngoscopic findings, were analyzed retrospectively. The demographic factors, cranial nerve involvement, and recovery rate of both groups were evaluated.

RESULTS: Sixty patients in the non-HZL group and 13 patients in the HZL group were analyzed. Five more patients in the non-HZL group were newly identified with HZL during the retrospective chart review. The mean age of the patients in the HZL group was higher than that of the non-HZL group (p = 0.016). The prevalence of hypertension was higher in the HZL group (p = 0.012). Patients with multiple cranial nerve involvement were more common in the HZL group (p < 0.001). In addition, the prognosis of facial weakness (p = 0.002) and multisensory dizziness (p = 0.006) was poor in HZL group.

CONCLUSION: This study showed that a considerable proportion of HZL cases were misdiagnosed or overlooked if not suspected. Considering the poor prognosis of HZL patients with facial paralysis and dizziness, HZL should be diagnosed earlier and treated properly.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app