JOURNAL ARTICLE
RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
REVIEW
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A manual reduction of hernia under analgesia/sedation (Taxis) in the acute inguinal hernia: a useful technique in COVID-19 times to reduce the need for emergency surgery-a literature review.

BACKGROUND: Acute IH is a common surgical presentation. Despite new guidelines being published recently, a number of important questions remained unanswered including the role of taxis, as initial non-operative management. This is particularly relevant now due to the possibility of a lack of immediate surgical care as a result of COVID-19. The aim of this review is to assess the role of taxis in the management of emergency inguinal hernias.

METHODS: A review of the literature was undertaken. Available literature published until March 2019 was obtained and reviewed. 32,021 papers were identified, only 9 were of sufficient value to be used.

RESULTS: There was a large discrepancy in the terminology of incarcerated/strangulated used. Taxis can be safely attempted early after the onset of symptoms and is effective in about 70% of patients. The possibility of reduction en-mass should be kept in mind. Definitive surgery to repair the hernia can be delayed by weeks until such time as surgery can be safely arranged.

CONCLUSIONS: The use of taxis in emergency inguinal hernia is a useful first line of treatment in areas or situations where surgical care is not immediately available, including the COVID-19 pandemic. Emergency surgery remains the mainstay of management in the strangulated hernia setting.

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