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High Serum Phosphate Level as a Risk Factor to Determine Renal Prognosis in Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease: A Retrospective Study.

Background: Serum phosphate levels, which are associated with the progression of renal dysfunction in chronic kidney disease, in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) are lower than those in patients with other kidney diseases. However, their role in ADPKD remains unclear. This study aimed to determine whether serum phosphate levels could have an association with renal prognoses among patients with ADPKD. Methods: In total, 55 patients with PKD1 or PKD2 mutations but not undergoing dialysis were evaluated. Data regarding serum phosphate levels were collected, and Cox regression analyses were used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) with renal replacement therapy as the endpoint. Results: The median (quartile 1; quartile 3) serum phosphate concentration was 3.4 (3.1; 3.9) mg/dL, and the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was 39.5 (17.6; 65.7) mL/min/1.73 m2 . The multivariate analysis that included age, PKD1 mutation, eGFR, urinary protein excretion, hyperuricemia, and serum phosphate determined that eGFR (HR, 0.82; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.74-0.90; p < 0.0001) and serum phosphate (HR, 6.78; 95% CI, 1.94-34.02; p = 0.0021) were independently associated with renal replacement therapy. Conclusions: We found that serum phosphate levels were significantly associated with poor renal prognoses in patients with ADPKD.

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