Evaluation Study
Journal Article
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography versus endoscopic retrograde cholangiography for the pathological diagnosis of suspected malignant bile duct strictures.

To compare the diagnostic performance of percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography and endoscopic retrograde cholangiography for the pathological assessment of suspected malignant bile duct stricture, using brush cytology and forceps biopsy.The study group comprised 79 consecutive patients who underwent pathological assessment for suspected malignant biliary stricture, 38 of whom underwent percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (group A) and the other 41 underwent endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (group B). The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy were calculated. A subset analysis was performed to determine the effect of location and pathological type of the stricture on diagnostic performance, and complications were analyzed.The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy were 86.7%, 100%, 100%, 66.7%, and 89.5%, respectively, in group A, and 77.1%, 100%, 100%, 42.9%, and 80.4%, respectively, in group B. For hilar biliary strictures, the sensitivity and accuracy were superior in group A than in group B. Mild complications (transient c and bile leakage) were identified in 7 cases in each group, all resolved spontaneously within 3 to 5 days.Both brush cytology and forceps biopsy performed during percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography and endoscopic retrograde cholangiography provided good diagnostic sensitivity and accuracy. Therefore, both diagnostic approaches can play an important role in planning therapeutic strategy. However, for strictures located at the hilum, pathology sampling via percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography is preferable to endoscopic retrograde cholangiography, as it provides higher sensitivity and accuracy.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app