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Influence of Implant Neck Design on Crestal Bone Loss: A Comparative Study.

Background: The success rate of dental implants depends on the amount of crestal bone around the implants. Crestal module is the transosteal region of implant that is designed to receive the prosthetic component. The design of crestal module influences the crestal bone loss around implants.

Aim: The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the crestal bone loss around implants with smooth collar and implants with micro threaded rough collar design.

Materials and Methods: A total of 150 individuals received 100 dental implants. Each individual received one implant with smooth collar design (Group-A) and one implant with microthreaded rough collar design (Group-B) in the posterior edentulous region. All the 100 implants were prosthetically loaded after a healing period of 3 months. Crestal bone loss was measured on mesial, distal, buccal, and lingual side of each implant using periapical radiographs before loading (baseline), immediately after loading, 6, and 12 months after loading.

Results: The average crestal bone loss 12 months after loading the implants in Group A and Group B was 3.75 mm and 3.23 mm, respectively, the value being statistically significant ( P < 0.05). In both Group A and Group B, the average crestal bone loss was maximum on the lingual side followed by buccal, distal, and mesial sides.

Conclusion: Crestal bone loss around rough-surfaced microthreaded neck implants was significantly lower than smooth-surfaced neck implants.

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