Journal Article
Observational Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
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Percutaneous needle fasciotomy in Dupuytren contracture: a register-based, observational cohort study on complications in 3,331 treated fingers in 2,257 patients.

Background and purpose - Percutaneous needle fasciotomy (PNF) is a minimally invasive treatment option for Dupuytren contracture, which has gained momentum worldwide in recent years. However, evidence regarding safety and severe complications associated with PNF is sparse. Thus, we evaluated safety of a specific PNF method in the largest cohort reported in literature.Patients and methods - This is a single-center, register-based, observational study on PNF treatments between 2007 and 2015. The study cohort was identified by the Danish National Patient Registry, and diagnosis codes and procedure codes were used to identify potential severe postoperative complications such as: tendon rupture, nerve damage, infection, amputation, and reflex dystrophy for all index treatments. The Danish National Prescription Registry was used to identify non-hospital-treated infections. All index treatments and postoperative complications were verified by review of medical records.Results - 2,257 patients received PNF treatment of 3,331 treated finger rays. Median follow-up was 7.2 years (interquartile range: 4.9-9.5 years, range 1-12 years). 4 patients sustained flexor tendon rupture. 1 patient had digital nerve damage. 2 patients had an infection treated in hospital, while 31 patients received antibiotics in the primary sector for an infection or based on suspicion of an infection after PNF. None of the infections required surgical intervention. No finger amputations or ipsilateral upper limb reflex dystrophy cases were registered in relation to the procedure.Interpretation - Percutaneous needle fasciotomy for Dupuytren contracture is a safe procedure with a low rate of severe postoperative complications when a specific PNF method is applied.

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