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Rectal Temperature of Corpse and Estimation of Postmortem Interval.

Fa Yi Xue za Zhi 2019 December
Measurement of corpse temperature is mainly used for estimation of early postmortem interval, and rectal temperature is often used as a representative of body's core temperature in actual work because it is simple, quick and non-invasive. At present, the rectal temperature postmortem interval estimation method internationally accepted and widely used is HENSSGE's nomogram method, while many domestic scholars also deduced their own regression equations through a large number of case data. Estimation of postmortem interval based on rectal temperature still needs further study. The nomogram method needs to be optimized and extended, and quantification of its influencing factors needs to be dealt with more scientifically. There is still a lack of consensus on the probability and duration of the temperature plateau. There is no clear understanding of the probability and extent of the change in initial temperature caused by various causes. New methods and ideas enrich methodological research, but it still lacks systemicity and practicality. This article reviews the researches on estimation of postmortem interval based on rectal temperature in order to summarize the current situation of previous researches and seek new breakthrough points. Because the decline of body temperature can be easily influenced by many factors in vitro and vivo, and the influencing factors in different regions vary greatly, regionalization research and application may be a practical exploration to improve the accuracy of postmortem interval determination.

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