Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Systematic Review
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Technical success rate and safety of radiologically inserted gastrostomy versus percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy in motor neuron disease patients undergoing: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

OBJECTIVE: Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) and radiologically inserted gastrostomy (RIG) have gained increasing popularity among clinicians and motor neuron disease (MND) patients for maintaining adequate nutritional intake. However, there is no consistent evidence of the efficacy and safety of the two techniques in MND patients. We carried out a systematic review and meta-analysis to examine the technical success rates, complication rates and 30-day mortality of MND patients receiving PEG and RIG.

METHODS: We searched PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, Web of Science and Scopus from inception to September 12, 2019 for comparative studies on the efficacy and safety of PEG and RIG in MND patients. The primary outcome was technical success rate and the secondary outcomes were complication rates and 30-day mortality.

RESULTS: Seven studies (n = 603) were included. Pooled technical success rates were 90.15% in patients receiving PEG and 96.76% in patients undergoing RIG. There was a statistically significant difference in the technical success rate between RIG and PEG, strongly favoring RIG [(OR = 3.96, 95% CI (1.31to 12.02); P = .02]. Pooled major complication rates were 2.19% in patients receiving PEG and 0.07% in patients undergoing RIG, with no statistical difference (P = .08). Pooled procedure-related 30-day mortality rates were 5.31% in patients receiving PEG and 6.00% in patients undergoing RIG, with no statistically significant difference (P = .75). No publication bias was noted.

CONCLUSION: The present meta-analysis demonstrated that, compared to PEG, RIG has a higher technical success rate and has a comparable mortality outcome and safety profile.

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