Clinical Trial, Phase I
Clinical Trial, Phase II
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
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Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Intrathecally Administered Recombinant Human Arylsulfatase A (TAK-611) in Children With Metachromatic Leukodystrophy.

Metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD) is a lysosomal storage disease caused by deficient arylsulfatase A (ASA) activity, which leads to neuronal sulfatide accumulation and motor and cognitive deterioration. Intrathecal delivery of a recombinant human ASA (TAK-611, formerly SHP611) is under development as a potential therapy for MLD. We used serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) TAK-611 concentrations measured during the phase I/II trial of intrathecal TAK-611 to develop a pharmacokinetic (PK) model describing drug disposition. CSF data were well characterized by a two-compartment model in the central nervous system (CNS); a single central compartment described the serum data. Estimated parameters suggested rapid distribution of TAK-611 from CSF into the putative brain tissue compartment, with persistence in the brain between doses (median distributive and terminal half-lives in the CNS: 1.02 and 477 hours, respectively). This model provides a valuable basis for understanding the PK distribution of TAK-611 and for PK/pharmacodynamic analyses of functional outcomes.

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