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Receptive language acquisition in a pediatric population with Pendred syndrome and non-syndromic enlarged vestibular aqueduct.

Background: Children with Pendred syndrome (PS) and non-syndromic enlarged vestibular aqueduct (NSEVA) represent a group of pre-lingual hearing-impaired individuals with rehabilitation challenges. Objective: To evaluate receptive language capabilities in a pediatric cohort with PS and NSEVA. Materials and methods: Twenty-four (24) children diagnosed with either PS or NSEVA, were examined using the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT) and compared to a cohort of 55 Danish children with normal hearing, as well as to a mixed group of 29 children with hearing impairment of congenital and hereditary non-syndromal type. In addition, test results were compared to normative data (PPVT-4 US standard scores). Results: PS/NSEVA children's PPVT-4 test scores fall within the normative data for the PPVT-4 (US) but proved to be significantly lower statistically, when compared to Danish children with normal hearing ( p <.0001) or to children with mixed non-syndromic hereditary hearing impairment ( p =.006). Implantation age was significantly later for the PS/NSEVA group (median = 43 months), compared to the mixed non-syndromic hereditary congenial hearing impairment group (median = 11 months). Conclusions and significance: Children with PS/NSEVA perform below age equivalent for receptive vocabulary outcome when compared to both children with normal hearing, and children with non-syndromic mixed hereditary congenital hearing impairment who receive cochlear implants earlier.

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