Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Differentiating borderline personality disorder (BPD) from bipolar disorder: diagnostic efficiency of DSM BPD criteria.

OBJECTIVE: We sought to determine the differential diagnostic efficiency of all DSM-IV borderline personality disorder (BPD) criteria by studying a sample of those with BPD and a contrast group with a bipolar disorder (BP).

METHOD: Participants were clinically assessed and assigned diagnoses based on DSM criteria - with prevalence rates and diagnostic efficiency values calculated.

RESULTS: Fifty-three participants were assigned a BPD diagnosis, 83 a BP diagnosis, with comorbid participants excluded. The mean number of DSM BPD criteria assigned was 6.6 (SD = 1.0) in the BPD group and 1.9 (SD = 1.3) in the BP group. The most prevalent criterion in the BPD group was 'affective instability' (AI) (92.5%), with 'inappropriate anger' least endorsed (49%). The highest specificity criterion was 'abandonment fears', which displayed the greatest positive predictive value (PPV) = 0.9, and with AI offering the lowest specificity. 'Unstable relationships' had the highest overall negative predictive value (NPV) = 0.91. The highest percentage accuracy of classification was provided by 'identity disturbance' and 'abandonment fears' criteria, both 85%.

CONCLUSION: The transdiagnostic nature of 'affective instability' means it is less useful for diagnostic decisions, whereas 'abandonment fears' and 'identity disturbance' offer superior diagnostic efficiency in distinguishing BPD from BP.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app