JOURNAL ARTICLE
REVIEW
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Efficacy of anti-microbial catheters in preventing catheter associated urinary tract infections in hospitalized patients: A review on recent updates.

Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) are the common hospital-associated infections (HAIs), which can be prevented by practicing necessary precautions and by using antimicrobial urinary catheters (UCs). The efficacy of antimicrobial UCs against standard catheters for averting CAUTIs is poorly studied. The objective of the review is to analyze the efficacy of various types of antimicrobial UCs used in hospitalized patients in preventing CAUTIs. The major antimicrobial UCs are silver and antibiotic catheters, in contrast, few antimicrobial catheters include antimicrobial peptides, bactericidal enzymes, bacteriophages, and many are under clinical evaluation. The review concludes that even though many antimicrobial methods are available to prevent CAUTIs, the incidence rate is still high. Antibiotic resistance, leaching of catheter materials which may cause side effects and additional costs are the major challenges for the UCs. Further research is warranted and should focus on cost-effective and ideal antimicrobial UCs, in which the microorganisms cannot form biofilms or develop resistance.

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