JOURNAL ARTICLE
REVIEW
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Malignant external otitis in children.

Journal of Pediatrics 1988 December
Malignant external otitis in the pediatric population is primarily a disease of children with chronic illness or immunosuppression. The presence of severe, unrelenting otalgia, otorrhea with isolation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a markedly elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and evidence of bone destruction on computed tomography scan should alert the clinician to the diagnosis. Unlike adults, children have a higher incidence of seventh nerve paralysis earlier in the course of the infection. They also manifest more frequent involvement of the middle ear with tympanic membrane destruction. The short interval between the onset of symptoms and facial nerve dysfunction highlights the necessity of prompt diagnosis and institution of anti-Pseudomonas therapy. Our review suggests that this destructive bacterial infection is an emerging clinical entity in children; 73% of the cases have been reported since 1980. Pediatricians should therefore be familiar with the clinical presentation of this treatable infection. Substantial morbidity could be alleviated by prompt diagnosis and early antibiotic treatment.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app