Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Treatment of brittle nail with a hydroxypropyl chitosan-based lacquer, alone or in combination with oral biotin: A randomized, assessor-blinded trial.

Dermatologic Therapy 2019 September
We evaluated in a randomized, assessor-blinded, study the efficacy of a hydroxypropyl chitosan-based nail lacquer (HPC-NL) alone or in combination with oral biotin (HPC-NL + B) in the treatment of brittle nail syndrome (BNS). Fifty subjects (21 men; mean age 64 years) with BNS were enrolled. Twenty-six were randomly assigned to HPC-NL and 24 to the HPC-NL and biotin, 10 mg/daily (+B). Topical and oral treatments lasted for 4 consecutive months. The primary outcome was the evolution of the Onychodystrophy Global Severity Score (OGSS) assessing nail dystrophy, lamellar and longitudinal splitting, dyschromia, and pitting. At baseline, the OGSS, mean (SD), was 8.4 (2.1) in the HPC-NL group and 11.8 (2.3) in the HPC-NL + B group. The OGSS was significantly reduced during treatments in both groups. At Month 4, OGSS was reduced by 57% (HPC-NL) and 62% (HPC-NL + B). At the end of study period, the percentage of subjects with an OGSS reduction of ≥50% in comparison with baseline was 53% in the HPC-NL group and 80% in the HPC-NL + B group (p = .05). Both treatments were well tolerated. In subjects with BNS, HPC-NL alone is associated with a clinically relevant improvement of nail appearance. The combination of HPC-NL and oral biotin is associated with further clinical improvement.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app