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The prediction value of scoring systems in Mallory-Weiss syndrome patients.

Mallory-Weiss syndrome (MWS) is a relatively less common cause of nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. There is limited data on whether scoring systems could be used to predict the clinical outcomes in patients with bleeding due to MWS. The aim of our study is to evaluate whether the Glasgow-Blatchford score (GBS), AIMS65, and shocking index are effective in predicting the clinical outcomes of MWS.One hundred twenty-eight patients from January 2010 to January 2017 with MWS in middle China were enrolled. Clinical features such as age, gender, causes of vomiting, endoscopic findings, GBS, AIMS65, and shocking index were recorded. The clinical outcomes including endoscopic treatment and transfusion were analyzed.MWS accounted for 6.1% of nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Male-to-female ratio was 3.6:1 and median age was 51 years. Patients between 40 and 60 years were more commonly affected; 43.8% of MWS was caused by overdrinking followed by underlying gastric diseases (33.6%). However, for female patients alone, underlying gastric diseases were the leading cause (42.9%). The tears were usually single and most frequently located on the left lateral wall. In receiver-operating characteristic curve analyses, GBS system and shocking index were useful in predicting transfusion (0.856 vs 0.675). But for endoscopic intervention, these scoring systems are not helpful (P > .05).Apart from drinking, underlying gastric disease is another important cause of MWS especially for female patients and should be paid more attention under endoscopy examination. GBS system and shocking index can be used to predict transfusion.

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