CASE REPORTS
JOURNAL ARTICLE
REVIEW
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Acute Pulmonary Embolism Presenting with Symptomatic Bradycardia: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

BACKGROUND Acute pulmonary embolism (PE) is a common life-threatening cardiovascular emergency. The diagnosis of PE may be challenging, as there can be a wide range of atypical presentations. CASE REPORT A 92-year-old man with asymptomatic first-degree atrioventricular (AV) block, hypertension that was controlled on medication, and a past medical history of deep venous thrombosis (DVT), presented with dizziness, weakness, and collapse while getting dressed. On examination by the attending paramedics, he was noted to have sinus bradycardia at a rate of 18 bpm, which improved to 80 bpm after intravenous injection of atropine. An echocardiogram obtained in the emergency room (ER) showed a markedly dilated right ventricle (RV) with a hypokinetic RV free wall, preserved RV apical contractility, and septal wall motion abnormalities consistent with RV pressure overload. A ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) scan showed a massive PE involving more than 50% of the pulmonary vasculature. Urgent catheter-directed thrombolysis was performed, but the patient's condition deteriorated, and he died shortly afterward. CONCLUSIONS Sinus bradycardia is an unusual initial presentation of PE, but the diagnosis should be considered in patients with multiple risk factors for thromboembolism.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app