Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Clinical efficacy of high-flow oxygen therapy through nasal cannula in patients with acute heart failure.

BACKGROUND: High-flow oxygen therapy through nasal cannula (HFNC) could reduce intubation rate and mortality rate among patients with acute respiratory failure. We evaluated the physiological responses and clinical outcomes of HFNC in patients with acute heart failure (AHF).

METHODS: A retrospective cohort analysis was performed in single medical tertiary center. Patients with AHF who had a progressive hypoxemia after oxygenation via facemask were divided into intubation group and HFNC group. We analyzed the physiological responses and in-hospital clinical outcomes between two groups.

RESULTS: Seventy-three patients of intubation group and 76 patients of HFNC group were included. Baseline characteristics were well-balanced between two groups. There were no differences in changes of mean arterial pressure, heart rate, and pulse oxygen saturation during the first 6 hours. Among HFNC group, 66 of 76 patients (86.8%) were successfully recovered from progressive hypoxemia without endotracheal intubation, and there were no differences in in-hospital clinical outcomes between two groups.

CONCLUSIONS: This study showed HFNC group had a similar result of improvement of oxygen saturation and in-hospital clinical outcomes compared with intubation group in AHF. Present study supported HFNC could be considered as initial choice of oxygen therapy in selected patients of AHF.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app