JOURNAL ARTICLE

Outcomes of arteriovenous fistula reconstruction in vascular access dysfunction

Nail Kahraman, Deniz Demir
American Journal of Translational Research 2019, 11 (2): 1058-1065
30899405

BACKGROUND: Complications such as stenosis, thrombosis, aneurysmal dilatation, and infection occur in at least one-third of all arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs). Due to these complications, vascular access dysfunction develops in hemodialysis patients.

OBJECTIVES: We investigated AVF rescue operations, which we performed for the pathologies causing dysfunctional vascular access, and outcomes of these operations by surgeon-performed preoperative ultrasound (US) in our clinic.

DESIGN: Retrospective Study.

SETTINGS: Bursa Yüksek Ihtisas Training and Research Hospital Cardiovasculary Surgery Department, Turkey.

PATIENTS AND METHODS: 67 patients who were treated in our clinic due to AVF dysfunction between January 2012 and January 2016 were included in the study. Preoperative US evaluation for dysfunctional AVFs was performed by the surgeon conducting the operation. The patients were divided into 5 groups according to the pathologies such as stenosis, thrombosis, aneurysm, high-flow rate, and deep basilic vein.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Our goal in all patients with vascular access dysfunction was to maintain the AVF.

SAMPLE SIZE: 67 Patients.

RESULTS: In Group 1 (16 patients) which had stenosis and underwent AVF reconstruction, the 24-month primary patency rate was 81.3%. In Group 2 (9 patients) which had trombosis and underwent AVF reconstruction, the 24-month primary patency rate was 22.2%. In Group 3 (24 patients) which had AVF aneurysm and underwent AVF reconstruction, the 24-month primary patency rate was 70.8%. In Group 4 (10 patients) which had high flow and underwent AVF reconstruction, the 24-month primary patency rate was 90%. In Group 5 (8 patients) which had deep basilic vein and underwent AVF reconstruction, the 24-month primary patency rate was 75%.

CONCLUSION: Leaving patients with vascular access dysfunction to fate (no intervention) or AVF ligation is always simpler and easier. However, it should not be forgotten that paternity for vascular access are limited in these patients. We think that the primary target is to demonstrate AVF by physical examination and surgeon-performed detailed US and to make it again available for hemodialysis by reconstructing dysfunctional AVF using the most appropriate surgical strategy.

LIMITATIONS: Retrospective, small sample size.

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