Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
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Corticosteroids versus vestibular rehabilitation in long-term outcomes in vestibular neuritis.

BACKGROUND: The management strategy for functional recovery after vestibular neuritis (VN) has not yet been established. Therapeutic choices involve corticosteroids, vestibular rehabilitation therapy (VRT) and the combination of corticosteroids with VRT.

OBJECTIVE: The present study aimed to compare the efficacy of corticosteroids, vestibular rehabilitation, and combination of them in terms of subjective and objective improvement in patients with VN.

METHODS: A prospective randomized study was conducted on 60 patients with acute vestibular neuritis within 3 days after symptom onset. The patients were divided into three groups; steroid group treated with corticosteroids (n = 20), VRT group (n = 20) managed with vestibular rehabilitation exercises and combination group (n = 20) received combined (corticosteroids and vestibular exercises). Groups were compared by caloric lateralization, vestibular myogenic potential amplitude asymmetry and Dizziness Handicap Inventory scores, both at presentation and up to 12 months.

RESULTS: The study found no statistically significant difference between the three groups of the study at the end of the follow up period.

CONCLUSION: Corticosteroids and VRT seem to be equivalently effective in patients with VN. The study proposes that corticosteroids may accelerate the recovery of VN, with no more beneficial role in the long-term prognosis of the disease.

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