Journal Article
Review
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Management of pelvic organ prolapse in the elderly - is there a role for robotic-assisted sacrocolpopexy?

Abdominal sacrocolpopexy is considered the gold standard treatment for symptomatic pelvic organ prolapse (POP). Since its introduction, robotic-assisted sacrocolpopexy has emerged as a popular minimally invasive alternative to open repair. Epidemiologic data suggest that the number of women seeking surgical treatment for POP will increase to ~50% by 2050, and many of these women will be elderly. Advanced age should not preclude elective POP surgery. Substantial data suggest that medical comorbidities and other preoperative markers may be more important than age in predicting adverse surgical outcomes. POP surgery in the elderly has been extensively studied and found to be safe, but there is a paucity of information regarding robotic-assisted sacrocolpopexy in this population. Data are only beginning to emerge regarding the safety and efficacy of robotic surgery in the elderly, with most studies focusing on oncologic procedures. Preliminary studies in this setting suggest that elderly patients may benefit from a minimally invasive approach, although given their limited physiologic reserves, appropriate patient selection is essential. The purpose of this review article is to evaluate the stepwise management of POP in the elderly female, with a focus on the safety and feasibility of a robotic approach.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app