JOURNAL ARTICLE
RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Defective Epstein-Barr virus in chronic active infection and haematological malignancy.

Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection is highly prevalent in humans and is implicated in various diseases, including cancer1,2 . Chronic active EBV infection (CAEBV) is an intractable disease classified as a lymphoproliferative disorder in the 2016 World Health Organization lymphoma classification1,2 . CAEBV is characterized by EBV-infected T/natural killer (NK) cells and recurrent/persistent infectious mononucleosis-like symptoms3 . Here, we show that CAEBV originates from an EBV-infected lymphoid progenitor that acquires DDX3X and other mutations, causing clonal evolution comprising multiple cell lineages. Conspicuously, the EBV genome in CAEBV patients harboured frequent intragenic deletions (27/77) that were also common in various EBV-associated neoplastic disorders (28/61), including extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma and EBV-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, but were not detected in infectious mononucleosis or post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (0/47), which suggests a unique role of these mutations in neoplastic proliferation of EBV-infected cells. These deletions frequently affected BamHI A rightward transcript microRNA clusters (31 cases) and several genes that are essential for producing viral particles (20 cases). The deletions observed in our study are thought to reactivate the lytic cycle by upregulating the expression of two immediate early genes, BZLF1 and BRLF14-7 , while averting viral production and subsequent cell lysis. In fact, the deletion of one of the essential genes, BALF5, resulted in upregulation of the lytic cycle and the promotion of lymphomagenesis in a xenograft model. Our findings highlight a pathogenic link between intragenic EBV deletions and EBV-associated neoplastic proliferations.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app